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Wine Storage Blog

Custom Wine Cellars & Wine Storage Insights

Varietals & Profiles

  1. Romanian Wine

    Romanian Wine

    We often don’t hear much about Romanian wines, but Romania is in fact the 5th largest wine producer in Europe; only France, Spain, Italy, and Portugal produce more wine than Romaina.  With a history of winemaking that goes back over 2,500 years, coupled with unique geography (mountain ranges, valleys, coastal winds, and several microclimates), Romaina’s land is perfect for growing...
  2. A Little Bit About Prosecco

    A Little Bit About Prosecco

    Prosecco is an Italian sparkling wine that is often made Dry or Extra Dry.  Unlike sweeter sparkling wines, today's Prosecco is intended to be on the drier side.  Though Prosecco is often used as a Champagne (or other sparkling wine) substitute, it has its own distinctive taste.  While Champagne and other sparklers are sought after for their complexity, Prosecco is...
  3. What to Look for in Tawny Port

    What to Look for in Tawny Port

    Unlike its ruby cousin, tawny port’s signature color is a bit lighter, as is its body.  Simply put, it’s a more delicate wine that exhibits some of the softer traits of vintage port.  Unlike expensive vintage port, however, tawny port is available at a fraction of the cost. Tawny port is produced by blending older port wines.  Similar to ruby...
  4. What Is Aged Tawny Port?

    What Is Aged Tawny Port?

    Like its younger cousin, tawny port, aged tawny port is one of the two most-popular wines aged in Portugal.  Both tawny and aged tawny port begin as ruby port, but instead of aging the wine between two to seven years to create tawny port, aged tawny port is kept at least ten years in wood.  Oftentimes, aged tawny port is...
  5. What’s Vintage Port?

    What’s Vintage Port?

    Just as aged tawny ports are created from the “best” harvests, vintage port is made from only the finest harvests.  In fact, vintage port is the most desirable of all port wines, and collectors often proclaim vintage ports to be the pinnacles of their collections.   Vintage ports are very full-bodied wines with an abundance of sturdy tannins that make...
  6. Introducing Viognier

    Introducing Viognier

    While the Viognier grape may be new to most wine drinkers, it’s been grown in France’s northern Rhône region for centuries.  Because its acreage in France is relatively small, so is the French production of Viognier.  Interestingly enough, decent Viognier vineyards have appeared in California since the late 1980s, and Australia is also producing the grape. It’s tough to grow...
  7. Grüner Veltliner: Your New Favorite White Wine

    Grüner Veltliner: Your New Favorite White Wine

    Summer is coming to an end. But it doesn't go quietly: the most sweltering weeks of the year are now upon us. The dark, heavy reds of winter are the last thing on your mind. So what to drink? If you haven't yet tried Grüner Veltliner, Austria's dominant white wine varietal, it's time you did. Grüner Veltliners can vary widely from bottle to...
  8. A Taste of Napa's Growing Regions

    A Taste of Napa's Growing Regions

    What makes Napa Valley such a renowned area for growing wine grapes? It all comes down to the dirt. There are more than 30 types of soil in Napa Valley. The chemistry of this soil is the most important factor of what the French call “terroir," the distinctive tastes and aromas that an area’s specific conditions impart on the wine...
  9. A Guide to Italian Wines

    A Guide to Italian Wines

    Italians know their wine. But there are so many varietals from its sunny, breezy climes that sometimes the rest of us forget the difference between a Barbera and a Barbaresco. No fear: this handy guide will keep you straight. Italian Reds: Amarone: From the Veneto region come Corvina grapes, which are partially dried to make this big, full-bodied wine that...

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